© DAVID CARR-SMITH 2005 : all images & text are copyrighted - please accredit text quotes - image reproduction must be negotiated via dave@artinst.entadsl.com 
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CONTENTS   4 SITES  

SILO

  TETTERODE   DE LOODS   EDELWEIS   APPENDICES   NOTES   SUB-SITES

BOOK:  DAVID CARR-SMITH  -  IMPROVISED ARCHITECTURE IN AMSTERDAM INDUSTRIAL SQUATS & COLLECTIVES

"TETTERODE" SQUAT 1981-/COLLECTIVE 1986 to--  -p1(of 18)

 

   TETTERODE - p1:  INTRODUCTION 
> TETTERODE - p2:  PUBLIC-USE & WORK-SPACES > 
>
TETTERODE - p3:  RESIDENTIAL DOMAINS >

> TETTERODE - p4:  DACOSTAKADE BUILDINGS: MERKELBACH & HARTCAMP >

> TETTERODE - p5:  DACOSTAKADE: MERKELBACH APTS - mb//mb1/mb2 >

> TETTERODE - p6:  DACOSTAKADE: MERKELBACH APTS - mb3 >  

> TETTERODE - p7:  DACOSTAKADE: MERKELBACH APTS - mb4 >

> TETTERODE - p8:  DACOSTAKADE: MERKELBACH APTS - mb5/mb6 >

> TETTERODE - p9:  DACOSTAKADE: HARTCAMP APTS - hc//hc1/hc2 >  

> TETTERODE - p10:  DACOSTAKADE: HARTCAMP APTS - hc3 >

> TETTERODE - p11:  DACOSTAKADE: HARTCAMP APTS - hc4(1) > 

> TETTERODE - p12:  DACOSTAKADE: HARTCAMP APTS - hc4(2) > 

> TETTERODE - p13:  DACOSTAKADE: HARTCAMP APTS - hc5/hc6 >

> TETTERODE - p14:  BILDERDIJKSTRAAT BUILDINGS >

> TETTERODE - p15:  BILDERDIJKSTRAAT APTS - bd//bd1 >

> TETTERODE - p16:  BILDERDIJKSTRAAT APTS - bd2 >  

> TETTERODE - p17:  BILDERDIJKSTRAAT APTS - bd3 > 

> TETTERODE - p18:  BILDERDIJKSTRAAT APTS - bdN >

 

 

     

TETTERODE - BILDERDIJKSTRAAT FACADE 

(pic 8-1995 / to NW)

.

TETTERODE INTRODUCTION 

THE FACTORY, THE SQUAT, THE COLLECTIVE  
THE SITE AND PATTERN OF OCCUPATION 

.

INTRODUCTION

I first photographed Tetterode in 1990. In 93/94 I made the bulk of the 1990s living-space recordings. In 2006 I resumed recording Tetterode's exteriors and circulation-spaces. In 2008, after an interval of 14 years, I made a new set of recordings of many living-spaces (including some not previously visited) in all but one of Tetterode's fifteen enclaves. 

Significant design-developments here are almost always driven by home-elaborating individuals and design-development is the principal theme of this account - thus with regard to living-spaces (and sometimes their enclaves) the 2008 recordings are displayed separately but 'in parallel' with those from the 1990s to facilitate comparisons. With regard to the building exteriors and circulation spaces the main consideration is establishing a sense of the geography of the site, thus though there were late-90s Collective-initiated 'improvements' in these areas these are superficial and such images are inserted in location-sequence irrespective of date.

In the mid 1990s Tetterode contained and supported approx 55 rented work-spaces and approx 73 living-spaces - in 2008 there are approx 67 due to merging of living-spaces. This huge collaborative enterprise (the Tetterode Collective) is organised by an elected committee which administers its interface with external authorities, and ideas, initiatives, practical tasks which issue from any of its social units (individuals, enclaves, external-renters) which may affect its communal aspects. Living-space initiatives, apart from those that impinge on the community (such as expanding an apt into shared circulation space), are private. Both the scale of essential administration and degree of interference in personal choice seems (surprisingly) minimal. 

This TETTERODE section is organised in three parts:

  1. p 1THE SITE:
    Introduction - Tetterode's history as a factory and its redevelopment as a working and domestic squat/collective. The organisation of its site and buildings, entrances and ground-level internal routes (the account of internal circulation is expanded in part-3 Residential Domains).

  2. p 2WORK PLACES
    Enterprises (mainly externally rented) and their locations: street-shops, businesses, workshops.

  3. p 3 - 18RESIDENTIAL DOMAINS:
    Residential locations and individual living-spaces. The three main residential buildings - each containing a stack of individually organised domestic 'enclave' floors - are shown in the following order: 
        p 4: DA COSTAKADE: two joined buildings: 'Merkelbach' and 'Hartcamp': 
            p 5 - 8: Merkelbach 
            p 9 - 13: Hartcamp 
        p 14: BILDERDIJKSTRAAT: two adjacent buildings: 'Old' and 'North': 
            p 15 - 17: Bilderdijk Old building 
            p 18: Bilderdijk North building  

.

THE FACTORY, THE SQUAT, THE COLLECTIVE
[Written 1990s]

Nicholas Tetterode opened his ‘Lettergieterij’ (making cast-lead printing type) on the Bloemgracht in 1856.

In 1901 the Tetterode factory was moved to the south end of Bilderdijkstraat near its junction with the Kinkerstraat. The architect J.W.F.Hartkamp designed the new Bilderdijkstraat building (famous for its enlightened ‘humanitarian’ provisions for the workers) and added a third floor in 1906, initiating the factory that the firm occupied until 1981 when it began its radical transformation by ‘squatters’ into housing.

In 1912 the factory site was extended eastward and Tetterode acquired a second street-front on Dacostakade with a second (and less inspired) J.W.F.Hartkamp block. In 1921 there was an internal expansion, and a Hartcamp re-vamp of the Bilderdijk building that acquired its de Lugt designed marble-floored and panelled entrance-hall. The final site enlargement began in 1941 with a single level repair shop extension northwards along Dacostakade. In 1949 this grew upwards into Merkelbach Karsten and Elling’s graceful concrete and glass block. Internally the junction of the 1912 and the 1941/49 buildings is a common stair and lift - externally the older building is at last afforded a role: its dull solidness enhances by contrast the light transparency and delicate poise of Merkelbach’s ‘Functionalist’ facade, which binds the other to it by releasing rhythms implied in its repetitive fenestration, and finally (in 1963) by reaching out along its top as a glass pavilioned penthouse.

In 1981 the Tetterode company merged with another and moved its factory elsewhere. The empty Tetterode was sold to a building contractor whose ‘re-development’ ambitions were intentionally frustrated by squatters.

Tetterode was ‘cracked’ on the 17th of October 1981 after two weeks observing the routines of the security guards. These guards and the carpenters who were dismantling valuable wood panelling and fittings in the admin and public areas of the buildings to take to the company’s new premises, were made to leave by the squatters. Thus the decor of the company’s ‘impressive’ Bilderdijkstraat Entry-Hall is still almost complete, though the famous Library (now the DijkTheatre) had already been completely stripped.

During the early stage squatters and security guards changed places several times, until the High Court ruled in favour of the squatters’ right to be there.

Of the many people involved in this initial phase of squatting very few intended to permanently live there. A local neighbourhood group of 30 or so squatted to preserve the buildings and camped in them, another 7 or 8 squatted as a political action. Of the many involved only about 10 participated in the eventual clearing and building of services and living-spaces.

In spring ‘82 a second phase of squatting began, a ‘domestic’ occupation of the Dacostakade building which later spread to the Bilderdijkstraat side. The latter building’s inner courtyard-front had been sealed for defense by the first squatters and its huge potential as living-space was ‘rediscovered’ only when entered from its 3rd-level access bridge.

With the re-development plans of its new owner legally blocked the site was re-sold in 1982 to a Pension Fund that was apparently happy to rent it to the squatters but is said to have been “authoritarian and patronising” and the relationship failed (gossip estimates that their involvement with Tetterode eventually lost them some 12,000,000 Guilders). It was sold yet again to less scrupulous speculators and eventually, after more legal wrangling bought by the City Council. The City had no development plans for the Tetterode neighbourhood and had never objected to its occupation. As its interface with Tetterode it appointed a non-profit philanthropic housing-corporation with an interest in low-income housing: the ‘Voningbouwvereniging het Oosten’ (with which the squatters had already held positive discussions) with the aim of negotiating the terms of a mutually acceptable contract.

In 1982 the Tetterode squatters had become a legal ‘Collective’ properly constituted with director, treasurer and secretary: the “Vereniging Ruimschoots” (loose translation: ‘Collective Lots and Lots’) - as this collective entity they “paid electricity bills and represented themselves”. In 1986 a contract between Het Oosten and the ‘Collective Lots and Lots’ was successfully negotiated and signed - to meet its requirements the Collective’s structure had been revised to include in its terms the whole building and each tenant, whether resident or renters of work-space - from then on the occupation of Tetterode is a normal residency. The parties decided on a ‘Casco rent model’ (‘casco’ (a ship’s ‘hull’) here refers to the basic carcass of the building: structural walls, roof, foundations, floors, electricity supply from street to meter), the Collective would rent Tetterode’s ‘casco’ from Het Oosten (for 264,000 Guilders per year reviewed every 15 years) and Het Oosten (with City finance of 2·4 million Guilders) would renovate and maintain it. The residents - if they did not contravene safety regs - retained their former planning independence. The Casco scheme was considered “ideal for young low-income resourceful self-help people” [1].

The renovation was not only expensive for the City but also for the tenants of the Collective - its new status required conformity to various regulations, few of which concerned the ‘casco’: the ageing factory cabling (bandaged copper in steel tubes!) must be replaced and inspected; gas be fitted by contractors; fire regs to be satisfied with changes to enclosures and exits: removal of the courtyard-covering roof for escape to the open air, separation of workshops and living-spaces (‘studio-apartments’ a wrangled exception!).

Three years before the contract was due the squatters had begun to pay into their Collective the higher rent anticipated from Het Oosten, using this accumulation to initiate certain renovations themselves - which risky investment (it is claimed) so persuaded Het Oosten of their seriousness that it positively induced the latter to sign.

Tetterode’s new legalised security provoked an influx of aspiring residents [2], and higher rents forced many who only worked there to move their homes inside. Building was energetic and cheap - the outer walls of living-spaces and all other shared aspects of Tetterode are financed from Collective rents and the new activity was boosted by an unforeseen Het Oosten grant [3] for internal renovations - everywhere sub-dividing of floors was planned and finalised with the ubiquitous cement-block walls. During four years or so after ‘86 (especially on the Dacostakade side - previously almost all studios) the physical and social environment rapidly changed and Tetterode acquired its present form.

The huge domestic structure of about 80 residents in 65 living-spaces and studios is piled on top of a busy work environment. Throughout Tetterode’s ground floors and basement, and in the Merkelbach L-1 "entresol" are work-places: around 55 spaces are rented to outside businesses (there is a waiting list!) - thus the lower parts of Tetterode are ‘connected to the city’ by way of a population of commuters!

Foot-Notes :

  1. Quote: in process ...

  2. Only the Collective can give notice or approve aspiring residents - though in practice it’s usually enough to be invited by a floor-enclave.

  3. Interest from a delayed use of the ‘Casco’ fund (see above: legalisation).

  4. Merkelbach’s basement was converted in 1992.

  5. “De Trut” is in the semi-basement of Bilderdijk, under the Lettermagazijn.

  6. When renovated the kindergarten acquired a new playground, designed and made by Rein van der Vliet (1995).

Sources : 

  1. Company and Building History: “Tetterode Nederland Amsterdam” archive: courtesy of Mr. Wim W Timmer (Jan ‘95).

  2. General info: Book; “Tetterode Complex”, Peter Sap, pub: De Balie - S.E.V - WV. Het Oosten.

  3. ‘Casco’ and rental info: Tetterode: Vereniging admin (Rein van der Vliet, ‘95).

 

TETTERODE: WHOLE SITE

(air-photo: date between 1950 and 1963 / to WWN)

[Photo: “Tetterode Nederland Amsterdam” archive: courtesy of Mr. Wim W Timmer] 

In these two photos the whole site is complete except for Merkelbach's 1963 penthouse extension across the Hartcamp building's roof.

The Tetterode factory straddles the width between two streets near the south end of a city-block bounded by Bilderdijkstraat (background), Dacostakade (foreground canal), and Kinkerstraat (across the left corner). Its chimney marks its south boundary. Its Dacostacade front consists of the two adjacent buildings beyond the sharp-gabled corner block - the first is the Hartcamp's 1921 building (minus its 1963 penthouse), the second Merkelbach's 1949 block. 

TETTERODE: WHOLE SITE

(air-photo: date between 1950 and 1963 / to NNW)

[Photo: “Tetterode Nederland Amsterdam” archive: courtesy of Mr. Wim W Timmer] 

In the foreground the Bilderdijkstraat (left) meets the Kinkerstraat. Tetterode begins beyond the pale corner building and its sharp-gabled neighbours. Tetterode's first factory building on this site is the pale rectangular 1901 Bilderdijkstraat block. This is separated by a central courtyard (still roofed in this picture), but joined by two bridges to the later 'Hartcamp' and 'Merkelbach' Dacostakade block.. 

 

TETTERODE: SECTION - FROM BILDERDIJK NORTH-BUILDING (bdN) ACROSS N-END WORKSHOPS TO DA COSTAKADE MERKELBACH (mb) 

(Architect-Drawing c1984 / section WWS to EEN)

 

TETTERODE: SECTION - FROM BILDERDIJK OLD-BUILDING (bd) ACROSS COURTYARD TO DACOSTAKADE HARTCAMP (hc)

(Architect-Drawing 4-1984 / section WWS to EEN)

 

TETTERODE: PLAN - LEVEL 01 (BASEMENT)

(Architect-Drawing 1986 / top is EEN)   
[all plans single sheet]

TETTERODE: PLAN - LEVEL 0 (GROUND)

(Architect-Drawing 1986 / top is EEN)   
[all plans single sheet]

TETTERODE: PLAN - LEVEL 1 ("ENTRESOL")

(Architect-Drawing 1986 / top is EEN)  
[all plans single sheet]

TETTERODE: PLAN - LEVEL 2

(Architect-Drawing 1986 / top is EEN) 
[all plans single sheet]

TETTERODE: PLAN - LEVEL 3

(Architect-Drawing 1986 / top is EEN) 
[all plans single sheet]

TETTERODE: PLAN - LEVEL 4

(Architect-Drawing 1986 / top is EEN
[all plans single sheet]

TETTERODE: PLAN - LEVEL 5

(Architect-Drawing 1986 / top is EEN) 
[all plans single sheet]

TETTERODE: PLAN - LEVEL 6 ("PENTHOUSE")

(Architect-Drawing 1986 / top is EEN)   
[all plans single sheet]

TETTERODE: PLAN - LEVEL 7 (ROOF &  "LOOKOUT") & LEVEL 8 ("LOOKOUT" ROOF)

(Architect-Drawing 1986 / top is EEN) 
[all plans single sheet]

.

THE SITE AND PATTERN OF OCCUPATION 
[Written 1990s]

Tetterode spans a city-block - a big rectangular castle with a 20m square central courtyard, its ends closed by workshops and its sides by two huge apartment buildings, both fronting streets. The east faces the charmed tree-lined calm of the house-boat fringed Dacostakade, the west faces the busy shopper-thronged tram-clanking Bilderdijkstraat. Enter Tetterode at either side and exit on the other into a different city!

The buildings’ conventional layers of big (typically around 400m2) unobstructed floors (already cleared of machines, but often cluttered with debris) presented few obstacles to apt building. Apart from the need in such a large scattered site for a sense of social identity and security, the formation of enclaves was an almost inevitable consequence of the buildings’ structural division into doored workshop-floors, accessed from main stairs - each easily sub-divided into a group of apts (sharing a shower/wc and kitchen) opening onto an internal passage [1], or in the less regular Bilderdijk building, a communal-hall space.

One of the characteristics of a visit to Tetterode is that - in spite of its atmosphere of active social community, the sense of manifold yet contained activity one gets in an isolated village - the whole place is extremely fragmented and neither entry or internal exploration is possible without keys. The devolution into enclaves intensified after the ‘86 legalisation when, during work by outside building contractors, street doors were often open and there were many thefts by interlopers - thus some of the cross-passages and ways around and through, that had bound together the huge set of buildings and maintained the sense, in spite of its enclaves, of a single warren-like community - were blocked or locked.  Even the site’s single (if convoluted) main circulation system which (except for two apts opening onto local entry-stairs) reaches all the enclaves [2] and the scatter of single apts and workshops, may be obstructed: recently both the large residential blocks had locked their exits into the central court, segmenting one of the two main routes that wind across the site from one street-front to the other, confining keyless visitors to a single block - increasing to the scale of whole buildings the sense of social divisions.

If it’s hard to get around inside it’s also hard to choose a way in - Tetterode castle's first defense is to confuse entry intentions. On its two street fronts Tetterode has 18 doors. 8 doors access ‘public cul-de-sacs’: single spaces entered directly from the street with no public access to the Collective's 'castle'; most of these, such as Bilderdijk's shops visibly serve only the street, however two (Bilderdijk’s night-club and Dacostakade’s Dijktheatre) confusingly resemble residential doors and open into passageways. 10 doors access the Collective's semi-public and residential spaces: 2 of these (one for vehicles) lead straight and visibly into the central courtyard; 4 are the street-doors of Merkelbach L0 workshops; and  5 access semi-public and domestic residential domains - 2 of these into mazes of routes and junctions [3] and 3 to a local enclave and enclave-accessing stairs. 

The Dacostakade side lacks the open public face of Bilderdijkstraat. At its north end are the private school and rented Merkelbach workshops. Near the block’s centre, next to the Dijktheatre door, is the main residential entrance (framed in labelled bells) into a tunnel-like passage to the main stair and a ramifying confusion of routes throughout the whole site. At the extreme south end through a little-used door, one may access a dirty foyer under a towering mesh of rusty lift-shaft; slog up the labour of its circling 'north-stair' - each landing presents the locked ‘rear-end’ of a floor-enclave - and, if the climber persists enough to reach the apparently blocked final flight and penetrate a seemingly private maze-like route through fragments of an occupied apt [4], emerge onto one of Tetterode’s strangest locations: the “Sky-Lawn” [5], a little ‘suburban’ garden cultivated on the building’s terminating terrace 25 meters above the inner court. Adjoining this 'north-stair' door is Tetterode’s vehicle entrance, (often used by commuters who rent work-spaces here); fronted by big 'castle-like' gates this is the Collective's most obvious ingress - a short straight tunnel under the bulk of the 1912 building and one is out into the bright courtyard. 

In this inclosed court the delicate trees and small garden features, children’s’ playground structures, seats, bikes, bakfiets, and signs of work in progress, would all be ‘out of place’ in a well-regulated factory let alone a large hotel. More warm and home-like than a ‘housing-scheme’: the social ambience is somehow too relaxed, even in the deserted courtyard - signalled in a myriad unobtrusive details: a possession unattended, a domestic chair, a cup with tea, a silvered window, a glimpse of structures built inside the rooms. The overlooking windows seem friendly and active; one is led by the details of collectively shared domesticity to remember that behind none of them are sterile suburban strained attempts to out-do neighbours and upbringing, to mimic perfection or wealth; or the death-empty average of hotel rooms; but the rich multiplicity of individuality and choice expressed.

At each end the courtyard presents a dramatic view-event framed between the big slabs of living-spaces. Above the south side workshops a remarkable row of super-sharp 19th century house gables like the lower jaw of a trap, threatens the square of sky held down between the flanking blocks - this stage-like setting is bisected by a thin tall chimney. Opposite, on the north side, the space is closed as if by a huge slatted wall: the workshops extend upwards as two flat-sided windowed bridges perched on legs like stacked coaches, joining Merkelbach and Bilderdijk.

Foot-Notes :

  1. Most emphatic in the Dacostakade buildings whose regular stacks of rectangular doored-floors branch from the central stair/lift like locked cul-de-sacs.

  2. All enclaves except the narrow, domestic-style building that extends the Bilderdijkstraat frontage northwards from the original 1901 factory block: the 'Bilderdijk North-Buildings'.

  3. The least specialised of Tetterode's 2 main routes gathers almost all the others - from the N-end workshops, the whole east side, the central Court, and thus (rather indirectly) the west side - like tributaries into the becalmed lake of the panelled Company Reception Hall, from which, after circling its central column, they pour into the Bilderdijkstraat through the erstwhile Tetterode Company's admin entrance [see below].

  4. The apt in question has ‘burst its bounds’: grown across a Collective corridor which now resembles ‘private-space’, seemingly cut-off the 'Sky-Lawn' from shared use, and via a platform even invaded the (redundant) lift-shaft!   

  5. “Sky-Lawn” is my name for this little garden with no horizon but its handrail & the sky.

 

                

TETTERODE ENTRANCES: PUBLIC AND RESIDENTIAL - 

PLAN - LEVEL 0 
(Mikel van Gelderen 2006 / amended 2008 / top is EEN)
There are 2 types of entry into this city-block-spanning site: 

1: 'Front-Doors' into the Collective: used by residents and outsiders who rent work spaces. 

2: Entries into public-use 'cul-de-sacs': shops, disco, theatre, etc..

[click for full info]

 

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TETTERODE'S EXTERIOR FACADES

DA COSTAKADE EAST-FACE OF TETTERODE  

(paste-up 2-pics 9-1994 / to  WWN)

The east side of Tetterode fronts the tree-fringed Dacostakade, its canal edged with house-boats that sometimes spread small gardens on the pavement - a peaceful idyll.

DA COSTAKADE EAST-FACE OF TETTERODE  

(pic 8-1995 / to  WWS)

Tetterode’s first Dacostakade building was the 1921 Hartcamp; in 1949 the factory expanded again with the elegant concrete and glass 7-level Merkelbach block; finally in 1963 Merkelbach's steel and glass 'penthouse' was extended across the top of Hartcamp. 

 

DA COSTAKADE EAST- FACE OF TETTERODE

(pic 8-1995 / to NW)

At the south end of the Hartcamp building Tetterode's big vehicle entrance opens directly into the central courtyard's SE corner. The six large windows were the erstwhile Company Library, now the Dijk Theatre and its north door serves the whole block's main stair/lift and a nexus of routes that ramify through the whole Tetterode site. North of Hartcamp, Merkelbach's building fronts the street with its four workshops.

BILDERDIJKSTRAAT WEST-FACE OF TETTERODE 

(pic 9-1994 / to N)

On its west side Tetterode’s street-front merges with the busy Biderdijkstraat, a traffic infested major shopping street, serving with the Kinkerstraat the populous suburb of the Kinkerbuurt.

BILDERDIJKSTRAAT WEST-FACE OF TETTERODE: OLD BUILDING 

(pic 9-1994 / to SE)

Hartkamp's 1901 building initiated the Tetterode company on this site. People passing by need hardly know this as a squat (unless they remember the political and neighbourhood activity of its youth).  Tetterode’s own entrances interleave unnoticeably with shops and café, and its big 1901 Jungenstijl street level windows comfortably transit from factory to commercial art gallery and clothes shop.

BILDERDIJKSTRAAT WEST-FACE OF TETTERODE: ALL FROM NORTH END 

(pic 17-4-2008 / to SE)

This is the whole Bilderdijkstaat facade, from the north end of the old building's north extensions. Parts of these were squatted in the late 1980s: their street level offices: three arched bays [pic: rt] and the two crudely renovated street-windows [pic:lt], plus the floor above the latter. 

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TETTERODE'S INNER FACADES AND CENTRAL COURTYARD 

COURTYARD: MAIN ENTRY - DACOSTAKADE VEHICLE ENTRY [5A] 
(pic 12-4-2006 / to W)

Tetterode's vehicle entry-door at the S end of the Hartcamp building. 

COURTYARD: MAIN ENTRY - DACOSTAKADE VEHICLE ENTRY TUNNEL
(pic 8-1990 / to W)

The vehicle entry-door fronts a tunnel that passes under the Hartcamp building and opens directly into the SE corner of the Courtyard.

 

COURTYARD: FROM HARTCAMP'S LEVEL 6 TERRACE
(pic 8-1993 / to WWS)

Looking down into the central courtyard from 25 meters up on the south-west corner terrace (my ‘Sky-Lawn’) of the Dacostakade Hartcamp building [hc-L6].

When squatted the court was a roofed garage - on legalisation fire-regs required an open-air escape space. 

The windows of the "Lettermagazijn" enclave [bd-L1] face across the court; on the left are metal workshops, to the right, above more workshops, the bridge to the 'Glazed-Court' enclave [bd-L2].

Between Rein van der Vliet’s central seat & the front-door of his tool-hire/metal-workshop, objects and plant-troughs, in association with the veranda roof-frame, are perhaps beginning to define an enclosure - in such ‘free’ environments architectural features grow with use!

COURTYARD W-FACADE: BILDERDIJKSTRAAT BUILDING 
(pic 8-1993 / to WWS)

The courtyard's west facade is the old Bilderdijk building [bd] (Hartkamp 1901 and 1906). Its lowest level is rented mainly to external businesses and its upper three are living-spaces. On this Courtyard side the lowest part of the facade walls a semi-basement (rented to a night-club) The lowest window-row is the strangely isolated "Lettermagazijn" bd-L1 enclave; the centre row are apts of the 'Glazed-Court' bd-L2 enclave; the top row are apts of bd-L3 enclave.

COURTYARD E-FACADE: DACOSTAKADE BUILDINGS (HARTCAMP)
(pic 8-1993 / to NE)

The courtyard's east facade is the south half of the Dacostakade [dc] block: the 1921 Hartkamp [hc] building). Merkelbach's 1963 penthouse caps the whole block.

At ground level [hc-L0] are the Dijktheatre offices, a shop, and the dark vehicle-entrance [5A] tunnel from Dacostakade. 

All windows above this ground level are living-spaces - five apt-enclaves and the single-apt 'penthouse': the L1"Entresol" (a lower 'half-floor'); L2; L3; L4; L5; L6.

COURTYARD N+E FACADES: BRIDGES JOIN DACOSTAKADE BUILDING
(pic 16-4-2008 / to NNE)

The bridges (flanked by tiny windows) enter the Dacostakade [dc] building's centre lift/stair landings. On this courtyard side the Dacostakade block is known as the 'Hartcamp' [hc] building, beyond the bridges - overlooking the N-end workshops - is the 'Merkelbach' [mb] building.

COURTYARD N-FACADE: WORKSHOPS & BRIDGES
(pic 8-1993 / to NW)

Workshops and bridges between Dacostakade's centre lift/stair and the old Bilderdijk building. The lower bridge leads from stair-landing dc-L2 directly into the bd-L2 'Glazed-Court' enclave; the upper from stair-landing dc-L3 directly into bd-L3 enclave.

COURTYARD S-FACADE: WORKSHOPS 
(pic 8-1993 / to SE)

Workshops with Tetterode's chimney; backed by astonishingly sharply gabled Kinkerstraat houses.

THE COURTYARD FROM THE NW-CORNER UNDER VERANDA 
(pic [damaged] 8-1993 / to EES)

 

COURTYARD E-FACADE S END WITH SIT PLACES & THE MAIN ENTRY TUNNEL 
(pic 1993 / to EEN)

Two work-spaces along the Courtyard's E side - on the left the Dijktheatre, on the right the "Pret" music shop - extend their entries into sitting places.

 

IN THE COURTYARD, UNDER THE VERANDA
(pic 8-1993 / to WWS)

Objects unconsciously ‘arranged’: the perfection of the order of convenience; a demo of the equation of practical-usage=design.

Childrens’ play-objects, a bakfiets, an (almost) arithmetical pile of wall-building cement-blocks - all posed on the pavement-grid like bad Surrealism or a Renaissance space-sketch.

IN THE COURTYARD: CENTRAL CHILD PLAY AREA
(pic 22-4-2008 / to EES)

In 2008 the mid-90s ad hoc scatter of childrens' play objects has become a central playground hedged by plant-troughs.

.

THE PRINCIPAL ENCLOSED ROUTE ACROSS THE SITE

This is the internal route that most nearly resembles an open alley between one street-front and the other (between the west side Bilderdijkstraat 165B and the east side Dacostakade 158). A general passage for commuting renters and residents alike, locked at both street ends but with no internal barriers, which serves almost all (the central courtyard access is sometimes locked) work-zones: the rear of the Bilderdijk Art Gallery, the rear of the courtyard's north side businesses, the workshops of the North-End, the rear of the Dacostakade street workshops, and the stairs up to the Merkelbach level-1 "Entresol" 'work-enclave' and beyond: for residents and visitors to the upper parts of both Dacostakade buildings the stair continues up for five more levels of locked residential enclaves. 

BILDERDIJKSTRAAT COMPANY ADMIN ENTRY 165B

(pic 1-5-2008 / to WWS)

Outside this heavy door is the sudden rush of bustling Bilderdijkstraat.

 

BILDERDIJKSTRAAT COMPANY ADMIN ENTRY: HALLWAY

(pic 19-4-2008 / to EEN)

 

THE COMPANY RECEPTION HALL: TO THE BILDERDIJKSTRAAT ENTRANCE

(pic 8-1993 / to WWS)

The strangest and grandest of the three Bilderdijk street entries is the 1921 ‘management entrance’. One is ushered by mirrors over marble into a once lavishly panelled (now mostly stripped) 11m x 8m reception hall, centered on a 7m-high feature: a Doric pillar springing like a (- kitsch inevitably invites mixed similes -) giant pistil from a petalled mahogany ‘salad-bowl’ skirted with a showcase like a glass tutu (for displaying Company memorabilia?). 

THE COMPANY RECEPTION HALL: TO THE N-END PASSAGE  

(pic 8-1993 / to SSW)

[written c1994: direct impressions]

From this magnificence there is now nowhere suitable to go - a narrow boarded passage exits from its rear into the tangle of workshops behind Merkelbach. With no present intention to power its pomposity it has become a cavity of the past - an almost empty place, restful, dreamy, stained with nostalgia - its spacious silence evaporates the tension of the busy street - an ante-room to the interior world of Tetterode: huge domestic and working pueblo.

THE N-END PASSAGE FROM HALL TO THE EAST SIDE

(pic 12-4-2006 / to EEN)

The passage from the rear of the Co. hall enables a walk through the whole site from Bilderdijkstraat to Dacostakade - passing between the two blocks of workshops (of the North-end and the Courtyard) and joining tributary routes that ultimately access the whole of Tetterode. 

Smartened up in the late 90s, this passage no longer underscores the pathos of the 'great' hall with sudden petty scale and shabby ad hoc walls [alas, there are no early 90s photos].

THE N-END PASSAGE FROM HALL TO THE EAST SIDE

(pic 8-1993 / to EEN)

Near the passage's east end where it widens and heightens between the workshops' inner walls. Facing us is the inner wall of Merkelbach's four Dacostakade fringing workshops; to the left opens a cul-de-sac serving two of these workshops, to the right is Dacostakade's centre stair/lift and a passage to residents' street entry 158.

 

 

THE N-END PASSAGE FROM HALL TO THE EAST SIDE

(pic 8-1993 / to SSW)

View back from the passage's east-end. On the left are Courtyard workshops; to our right the North-end block; behind us is Merkelbach.

THE N-END PASSAGE FROM HALL TO THE EAST SIDE

(pic 17-4-2008 / to SW)
T
he late 90s smartening of the austere N-end passage [see previous pic] has transformed
(presumably for outside users of its rented work spaces) the gloomy bike-cluttered space into a 'sketch' of a corporate 'palm-court' entry-hall. Its ludicrous 'smartiness' has been lampooned by a Tett resident who rendered the bifurcated yucca 'decent' with sewn on knickers.

THE N-END PASSAGE & DACOSTAKADE BLOCK'S CENTRE LIFT/STAIR FOYER

(pic 15-4-2008 / to S)

The east termination of the N-end passage - here it meets the foyer of the Dacostakade block, joins routes (stair and lift) to its upper levels; an entry to the Courtyard's NE corner, and a residents exit onto Dacostakade. Here the 'restyling' has produced a strange juxtaposition: the newly decored 'corporate' hallway (an inner entry point for rented business and workshop spaces) abjures the dark shabby (more 'domestic') bike encumbered Dacostakade foyer.

THE N-END PASSAGE: THE MERKELBACH BRANCH - VIEW FROM DACOSTAKADE BLOCK'S CENTRE STAIR
(pic 12-4-2006 / to N) 

A view along the rear of the four Dacostakade workshops (a cul-de-sac for visitors - ending in a locked door into the Kindergarten playground). Past the bike-stands the North-End passage opens to the left (west). The stair rises from Dacostakade's foyer to the level-1 'Entresol' work-zone plus all Dacostakade (Merkelbach's and Hartcamp's) residential levels.

THE N-END PASSAGE: THE DACOSTAKADE BLOCK'S CENTRE LIFT/STAIR FOYER

(pic 12-4-2006 / to SE)

Dacostakade's centre stair/lift foyer with its main (goods) lift doors. At the far end is a defunct passenger lift and round the far corner, the passage to residents' street entry 158.

DACOSTAKADE BLOCK'S CENTRE LIFT/STAIR FOYER: THE PASSAGE TO DACOSTAKADE 158 ENTRY
(pic 8-1993 / to EES) 

The passage to the residents' Dacostakade street entry 158. On the right (S side) is the wall of the Dijk Theatre; this was miscalculated and had to be rebuilt to allow the passage of trolleys.

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^ Top     > Next Page >

 

   TETTERODE - p1:  INTRODUCTION 
> TETTERODE - p2:  PUBLIC-USE & WORK-SPACES > 
>
TETTERODE - p3:  RESIDENTIAL DOMAINS >

> TETTERODE - p4:  DACOSTAKADE BUILDINGS: MERKELBACH & HARTCAMP >

> TETTERODE - p5:  DACOSTAKADE: MERKELBACH APTS - mb//mb1/mb2 >

> TETTERODE - p6:  DACOSTAKADE: MERKELBACH APTS - mb3 >  

> TETTERODE - p7:  DACOSTAKADE: MERKELBACH APTS - mb4 >

> TETTERODE - p8:  DACOSTAKADE: MERKELBACH APTS - mb5/mb6 >

> TETTERODE - p9:  DACOSTAKADE: HARTCAMP APTS - hc//hc1/hc2 >  

> TETTERODE - p10:  DACOSTAKADE: HARTCAMP APTS - hc3 >

> TETTERODE - p11:  DACOSTAKADE: HARTCAMP APTS - hc4(1) > 

> TETTERODE - p12:  DACOSTAKADE: HARTCAMP APTS - hc4(2) > 

> TETTERODE - p13:  DACOSTAKADE: HARTCAMP APTS - hc5/hc6 >

> TETTERODE - p14:  BILDERDIJKSTRAAT BUILDINGS >

> TETTERODE - p15:  BILDERDIJKSTRAAT APTS - bd//bd1 >

> TETTERODE - p16:  BILDERDIJKSTRAAT APTS - bd2 >  

> TETTERODE - p17:  BILDERDIJKSTRAAT APTS - bd3 > 

> TETTERODE - p18:  BILDERDIJKSTRAAT APTS - bdN >

 

CONTENTS   4 SITES  

SILO

  TETTERODE   DE LOODS   EDELWEIS   APPENDICES   NOTES   SUB-SITES